Thursday, December 22, 2011

RUNWAY INCURSION

G R Mohan | 12:37 AM | | | | | Best Blogger Tips
A runway incursion is an incident where an unauthorized aircraft, vehicle or person is on a runway. This adversely affects runway safety, as it creates the risk that an airplane taking off or landing will collide with the object.  It is defined by ICAO as Any occurrence at an aerodrome involving the incorrect presence of an aircraft, vehicle, or person on the protected area of a surface designated for the landing and take-off of aircraft.

A major disaster was averted at the CSI Airport , Mumbai last year after an aircraft, which was supposed to be on the taxiway, entered the runway area, while another had been cleared to land.
These close calls between aircraft and other planes, ground vehicles and hazards have grown steadily over the years and are now a grave concern for safety officials across the world.

An effective Runway incursion prevention program should be capable of
·         Alerting the pilots to conflicting traffic in the air and on the runways, taxiways and ramps;
·         Allowing more aircraft to land safely on time in bad weather
·         Improving communication between pilots and air traffic controllers ; and
·         Virtually eliminating the world’s greatest cause of aviation fatalities – controlled flight into terrain or CFIT.

Please offer your comments experiences and suggestions.

5 comments:

  1. The major root cause for incursions turns out to be the communication gap or ineffective communication .
    Readback and hear back of clearances by ATC and crew seem to be the common issue.
    When in doubt, the ATC and crew need to seek clarification from each other. Crew need to verify with ATC when in doubt on a clearance rather than form consensus in the cockpit.

    I would like to see electronic clearances something like akin CPDLC being introduced in the future, where we don't need to rely on verbal communication!!!!!!! Thats my pitch and you all have it implemented by ICAO

    ReplyDelete
  2. Here's an interesting study by NASA

    Runway Incursion Prevention System - A NASA study.

    A runway incursion occurs whenever there is an event that creates a possible collision between an aircraft and another aircraft, vehicle, or object on the runway. The world's deadliest aviation accident was the result of a runway incursion. On March 27, 1977 a Pan Am 747 and a KLM 747 collided on Tenerife, Canary Islands, resulting in the death of 583 passengers. Several other fatal runway incursions have occurred since then, including the recent disaster at Chiang Kai-Shek International Airport in Taipei, Taiwan on Oct.3 I, 2000. On this day, a Singapore Airlines 747 attempted to take off on a closed runway, and struck construction equipment on the runway, killing 82 passengers. With airport traffic continuing to increase, reducing runway incursions is becoming an increasingly important and challenging task. In recent years, runway incursion incidents on airport runways, taxiways, and ramps have continued to steadily increase in number. The number of runway incursions has increased 60% in the previous five years, and a record number of incursions happened in 2000. NASA Langley Research Centre is developing technology to improve the safety of airport surface operations and to reduce the number of runway incursions. This technology development is part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). Three key components of AvSP include: Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS), Hold Short Advisory Landing Technology (HSALT), and the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). These systems were flight tested and demonstrated successfully at the Dallas – Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) during October 2000. This report addresses the RIPS portion of the flight test at DFW. Specifically, this report documents the results of data analysis of performance data for the Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADSB) using 1090 MHz and Differential GPS (DGPS) prototype systems that Rockwell Collins supported on the NASA ARIES (Airborne Research Integrated Experiment System) research aircraft as part of the RIPS flight tests at DFW. ADS-B and DGPS are key enabling technologies of the NASA RIPS system. The RIPS system also includes an electronic moving map (EMM) which displays traffic on airport runways and taxiways on a head-down navigation display, a heads-up display (HUD) providing real time guidance, audible and visible incursion alerts, and several data links to provide a variety of information. This report describes the Rockwell Collins contributions to the RIPS demonstration system, summarizes the development process, and analyses the data collected during the flight tests and demonstrations at DFW. This work was performed under the NASA AGATE (Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments) contract NCA I- 125 (WBS Task 5.3.2). Included in the flight test evaluation were inter-operability tests between the NASA AGATE ADS-B flight test system and the NASA ARIES ADS-B system to assure that the "AGATE IB" aircraft ADS-B avionics arc compatible with those of high-end air transport aircraft such as the NASA ARIES 757.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Here's an interesting study by NASA

    Runway Incursion Prevention System - A NASA study.

    A runway incursion occurs whenever there is an event that creates a possible collision between an aircraft and another aircraft, vehicle, or object on the runway. The world's deadliest aviation accident was the result of a runway incursion. On March 27, 1977 a Pan Am 747 and a KLM 747 collided on Tenerife, Canary Islands, resulting in the death of 583 passengers. Several other fatal runway incursions have occurred since then, including the recent disaster at Chiang Kai-Shek International Airport in Taipei, Taiwan on Oct.3 I, 2000. On this day, a Singapore Airlines 747 attempted to take off on a closed runway, and struck construction equipment on the runway, killing 82 passengers. With airport traffic continuing to increase, reducing runway incursions is becoming an increasingly important and challenging task. In recent years, runway incursion incidents on airport runways, taxiways, and ramps have continued to steadily increase in number. The number of runway incursions has increased 60% in the previous five years, and a record number of incursions happened in 2000. NASA Langley Research Centre is developing technology to improve the safety of airport surface operations and to reduce the number of runway incursions. This technology development is part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). Three key components of AvSP include: Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS), Hold Short Advisory Landing Technology (HSALT), and the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). These systems were flight tested and demonstrated successfully at the Dallas – Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) during October 2000. This report addresses the RIPS portion of the flight test at DFW. Specifically, this report documents the results of data analysis of performance data for the Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADSB) using 1090 MHz and Differential GPS (DGPS) prototype systems that Rockwell Collins supported on the NASA ARIES (Airborne Research Integrated Experiment System) research aircraft as part of the RIPS flight tests at DFW. ADS-B and DGPS are key enabling technologies of the NASA RIPS system. The RIPS system also includes an electronic moving map (EMM) which displays traffic on airport runways and taxiways on a head-down navigation display, a heads-up display (HUD) providing real time guidance, audible and visible incursion alerts, and several data links to provide a variety of information. This report describes the Rockwell Collins contributions to the RIPS demonstration system, summarizes the development process, and analyses the data collected during the flight tests and demonstrations at DFW. This work was performed under the NASA AGATE (Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments) contract NCA I- 125 (WBS Task 5.3.2). Included in the flight test evaluation were inter-operability tests between the NASA AGATE ADS-B flight test system and the NASA ARIES ADS-B system to assure that the "AGATE IB" aircraft ADS-B avionics arc compatible with those of high-end air transport aircraft such as the NASA ARIES 757.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Here's an interesting study by NASA

    Runway Incursion Prevention System - A NASA study.

    A runway incursion occurs whenever there is an event that creates a possible collision between an aircraft and another aircraft, vehicle, or object on the runway. The world's deadliest aviation accident was the result of a runway incursion. On March 27, 1977 a Pan Am 747 and a KLM 747 collided on Tenerife, Canary Islands, resulting in the death of 583 passengers. Several other fatal runway incursions have occurred since then, including the recent disaster at Chiang Kai-Shek International Airport in Taipei, Taiwan on Oct.3 I, 2000. On this day, a Singapore Airlines 747 attempted to take off on a closed runway, and struck construction equipment on the runway, killing 82 passengers. With airport traffic continuing to increase, reducing runway incursions is becoming an increasingly important and challenging task. In recent years, runway incursion incidents on airport runways, taxiways, and ramps have continued to steadily increase in number. The number of runway incursions has increased 60% in the previous five years, and a record number of incursions happened in 2000. NASA Langley Research Centre is developing technology to improve the safety of airport surface operations and to reduce the number of runway incursions. This technology development is part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). Three key components of AvSP include: Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS), Hold Short Advisory Landing Technology (HSALT), and the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). These systems were flight tested and demonstrated successfully at the Dallas – Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) during October 2000. This report addresses the RIPS portion of the flight test at DFW. Specifically, this report documents the results of data analysis of performance data for the Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADSB) using 1090 MHz and Differential GPS (DGPS) prototype systems that Rockwell Collins supported on the NASA ARIES (Airborne Research Integrated Experiment System) research aircraft as part of the RIPS flight tests at DFW. ADS-B and DGPS are key enabling technologies of the NASA RIPS system. The RIPS system also includes an electronic moving map (EMM) which displays traffic on airport runways and taxiways on a head-down navigation display, a heads-up display (HUD) providing real time guidance, audible and visible incursion alerts, and several data links to provide a variety of information. This report describes the Rockwell Collins contributions to the RIPS demonstration system, summarizes the development process, and analyses the data collected during the flight tests and demonstrations at DFW. This work was performed under the NASA AGATE (Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments) contract NCA I- 125 (WBS Task 5.3.2). Included in the flight test evaluation were inter-operability tests between the NASA AGATE ADS-B flight test system and the NASA ARIES ADS-B system to assure that the "AGATE IB" aircraft ADS-B avionics arc compatible with those of high-end air transport aircraft such as the NASA ARIES 757.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Read back of ATC instructions continue to be a vexing issue. Recently there were two incidents of runway incursion that calls for some deep introspection.

    In the first case, the captain was busy with a PA announcement while the First Officer received an ATC instruction, which he readback incorrectly and advised the captain he was good to line up. ATC had infact advised the aircraft to hold position but failed to correct the readback from the First officer who understood that he had been cleared to line up and hold.The captain did not monitor the clearance and relying on advise from the First officer entered the runway causing a go around by an aircraft on approach.
    Another incursion of a more alarming nature was that of the captain initiating a takeoff without clearance from the ATC at Changi Airport a couple of days ago. ATC asked the pilot to reject take off. Apparently the reject was inititated at high speed and could have been critical but for the long runway at Changi.

    The trend is distrurbing. Do we monitor critical RT conversations ? Is this an issue, not addressed adequately the airlines ? Do we need an accident to be alive to this potential danger ?

    ReplyDelete